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Melanoma: Genetic Tumor Markers Can Predict Response Ipilimumab Treatment

Dr. Ahmad Tarhini, MD, PhD Associate Professor of Medicine, Clinical and Translational Science Department of Medicine Division of Hematology/Oncology University of PittsburghDermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Dr. Ahmad Tarhini, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine, Clinical and Translational Science
Department of Medicine
Division of Hematology/Oncology
University of Pittsburgh

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Tarhini: In evaluating the patients’ tumors at baseline (before initiating treatment with ipilimumab), we found that the differential expression of a relatively small group of genes that can be characterized as being immune related can significantly distinguish patients who benefited from ipilimumab immunotherapy versus those who did not.
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Melanoma Survival Decreased in Men Living Alone

DermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Hanna Eriksson, MD, PhD
Department of Oncology and Pathology
Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital
Stockholm. Sweden;

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Eriksson: We found that men living alone have a decreased survival in cutaneous malignant melanoma as compared to men living with a partner even after full adjustments including age, level of education and histopathologic prognostic factors. This was in part explained by more advanced stages of disease at diagnosis for men living alone

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Melanoma: Longer Telomeres May Explain Some Familial Predisposition

Carla Daniela Robles-Espinoza, PhD student Experimental Cancer Genetics Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Hinxton, UKDermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Carla Daniela Robles-Espinoza, PhD student
Experimental Cancer Genetics
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Hinxton, UK

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: Approximately 40% of familial melanoma cases can be explained by rare variants in a handful of genes, such as CDKN2A, CDK4, TERT and BAP1, but the causes of more than half of familial cases still remain unexplained. Here we set out to identify new high-penetrance susceptibility genes by sequencing the DNA of 184 melanoma patients that do not have mutations in these genes. We identified some families in which the gene POT1 is deactivated by specific mutations, leading to increased telomere length in carriers. This suggests that these variants predispose to melanoma formation via a direct effect on telomeres, the regions that protect our chromosomes from damage.
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Psoriasis: UV Light Treatment Did Not Diminish Systemic Markers of Inflammation

Plaque Type Psoriasis

DermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Dr. Charlotta Enerbäck MD, PhD
Ingrid Asp Psoriasis Research Center
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University
Linköping, Sweden.

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Enerbäck: We observe an increase in the plasma levels of several markers associated with cardiovascular risk in psoriasis patients. Several of these markers correlate with BMI and WHR and are therefore most likely the result of the increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with psoriasis. The levels of the markers were effectively diminished by treatment with the TNF-α inhibitor but they were not reduced by UVB treatment. This lack of reduction in cardiovascular risk markers after UV therapy suggests that this commonly used treatment might have a limited effect on the systemic inflammation and risk of cardiovascular co-morbidities in psoriasis. It also suggests that, in addition to alleviating psoriasis symptoms, systemic treatment with TNF-α inhibitors might also serve to reduce the risk of cardiovascular co-morbidities seen in psoriasis patients.
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Both Invasive and In-Situ Melanomas Raise Risk of Second Melanoma

Danny Youlden BSc Biostatistician Queensland,AustraliaDermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Danny Youlden BSc
Biostatistician
Queensland,Australia


DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: We found that all people who have been previously diagnosed with melanoma, whether it be invasive or in situ, had a significantly increased relative risk of a subsequent primary invasive melanoma – five and a half times higher following a first primary invasive melanoma and four and a half times higher after an in situ melanoma.  Another main finding was that the greatest relative risk tended to occur on the same part of the body as the original lesion, particularly when the first melanoma was on the head.  However, the relative risk remained elevated irrespective of body site, sex, age at first diagnosis and time between diagnoses.
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Toenail Fungus: No Improvement with Laser Treatment

dr_tyler_hollmig
DermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:

S. Tyler Hollmig, MD
Medical University of South Carolina Department of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery
As of September 2014:
Assistant Professor and Director of Cosmetic Dermatology, Stanford

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Hollmig: The potential utility of lasers for treating toenail fungus has been a hot topic in dermatology over the past number of years.  Many podiatrists and physicians already use lasers in this capacity despite a lack of strong evidence in favor of treatment efficacy.  We sought to evaluate the clinical and mycological clearance of toenails treated with 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser versus no treatment via a randomized, controlled trial.  Our study found no significant mycological culture or clinical nail plate clearance with 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser compared with control.

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HPV: Computerized Image Analysis May Distinguish Potentially Progressive Disease

Dr. Anant Madabhushi MD Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Computational Imaging & Personalized Diagnostics Case Western University Cleveland, OhioDermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Dr. Anant Madabhushi MD
Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Computational Imaging & Personalized Diagnostics
Case Western University
Cleveland, Ohio

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Madabhushi: Computerized image analysis of HPV associated head and neck tumor tissue specimens allows for discriminating between patients who go on to have disease progression versus those who do not.
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Rosacea: Systemic Safety Profile of MIRVASO Gel

Nathalie Wagner Clinical Pharmacokinetics manager Interview with: Global clinical development Galderma R&D – Sophia Antipolis/FranceDermatologistsBlog.com with:
Nathalie Wagner
Clinical Pharmacokinetics manager Interview with:
Global clinical development
Galderma R&D – Sophia Antipolis/France

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: The important outcome of our study is  the pharmacokinetic evidence supporting the good systemic safety profile of MIRVASO gel, the first treatment approved in the USA for facial erythema of rosacea.

This study is the first published maximal usage PK trial for a topical dermatological product. The objectives of this trial were:

-       To evaluate the systemic exposure under conditions that would maximize the potential for brimonidine absorption, in a manner that is consistent with Instructions for use of the product.

-       To compare this systemic exposure to the one observed with normal use of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution, approved by the FDA in 1996 under the brand name of “Alphagan”

This study demonstrated that the brimonidine blood levels are low, in the pg/mL range, and that there is no systemic accumulation over time with daily use. Furthermore, the systemic exposure to brimonidine under maximal usage conditions of MIRVASO gel is significantly lower than the systemic levels observed with the approved ophthalmic solution (brimondine tartrate 0.2%).

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Indoor Tanning Remains Common Among US Adolescents

dr_Gery GuyDermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Gery P. Guy Jr., PhD, MPH
Health Economist
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Guy:  This study found that indoor tanning and frequent indoor tanning (10+ tanning sessions per year) remain common among adolescents in the United States. Indoor tanning was associated with many risk health-related behaviors such as binge drinking and illegal drug use. Indoor tanning was also associated with factors linked to appearance, such as unhealthy weight control practices and taking steroids without a prescription. The clustering of risky behaviors suggests a need for coordinated, multifaceted approaches, including primary care counseling to address these behaviors. Public health efforts are needed to change social norms regarding tanned skin and to increase awareness, knowledge and behaviors related to indoor tanning. Read the full post »

Skin Cancer: Informational DVD Increased Whole Body Skin Examinations

DermatologistsBlog.com Interview with: 
DermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Monika Janda, PhD

School of Public HMonika Janda, PhD School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation Queensland University of Technology Brisbane, Queensland, Australiaealth and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Queensland University of Technology
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Janda: Our study tested whether sending study participants a DVD with detailed instructions on skin self-examinations and motivational messages in addition to a colourful brochure about the signs of skin cancer improves their skin examinations behaviours compared to a brochure only control group. This particular analysis focused on the clinical skin examination outcomes. We found that there was no difference in the proportion of men in the two groups who had any skin examination. However, the men in the intervention group were more likely to have a whole-body examination, and also a greater number of skin cancers diagnosed. This indicates that the encouragement by the DVD behavioural intervention had a positive effect.
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Salicylic Acid Toxicity From Topical Lotions

DermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Raman Madan MD
Beth Israel Medical Center
Mount Sinai Health System
Department of Dermatology
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: The main findings of the study are that salicylism (salicylic acid toxicity) can occur after topical application. After theoretically applying a 6% salicylic acid lotion to most of the arms, legs, and trunk of the body, patients can experience symptoms similar to an aspirin overdose. This includes symptoms that include but are not limited to nausea, vomiting, confusion, tinnitus, dizziness, coma, and even death. These cases of toxicity occurred mostly in patients with areas of skin breakdown.
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Scarring Alopecia: Hairstyle Contributes Strongly to Hair Loss

DermatologistsBlog.com Interview with:
Ncoza C. Dlova, MBChB, FCDerm Dermatology Department Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine University of KwaZulu-Natal Durban, South Africa.Ncoza C. Dlova, MBChB, FCDerm
Dermatology Department
Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Durban, South Africa.

DermatologistsBlog.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Diova:

  • CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion,
  • Hairstyling contributes strongly to the severity of the disease.
  • Natural hair is the best form of hair grooming in those who are affected to minimise the effect of chemicals and traction.
  • It seen less commonly and less severe forms are seen in males.

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